The Constitution of these United States

Constitutional Quiz

Test your Constitutional knowledge!

1. The Congress of the United States consists of…
the House of Representatives
The Congress shall consist of the House and Senate (Art 1 §1)
the Senate
The Congress shall consist of the House and Senate (Art 1 §1)
the House and Senate
2. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in..
the Senate
All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives (Art 1 §7)
legislative committees
All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives (Art 1 §7)
the House
the IRS
All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives (Art 1 §7)
3. Which of the following powers is NOT granted to Congress?
to coin money
The Constitution does not grant Congress the power to regulate schools. The Tenth Amendment says that all powers not listed are vested in the States and the People. How Congress came up with this power is beyond the scope of the plain wording and the intent of the Constitution.
to declare war
The Constitution does not grant Congress the power to regulate schools. The Tenth Amendment says that all powers not listed are vested in the States and the People. How Congress came up with this power is beyond the scope of the plain wording and the intent of the Constitution.
to fix the standards of weights and measures
The Constitution does not grant Congress the power to regulate schools. The Tenth Amendment says that all powers not listed are vested in the States and the People. How Congress came up with this power is beyond the scope of the plain wording and the intent of the Constitution.
to regulate schools
all of the above
The Constitution does not grant Congress the power to regulate schools. The Tenth Amendment says that all powers not listed are vested in the States and the People. How Congress came up with this power is beyond the scope of the plain wording and the intent of the Constitution.
4. The Bill of Rights consists of how many amendments to the Constitution?
three
The Bill of Rights is the first ten amendments to the Constitution.
twenty
The Bill of Rights is the first ten amendments to the Constitution.
five
The Bill of Rights is the first ten amendments to the Constitution.
ten
5. In regards to our rights, the Constitution:
gives them to us
Although Congress does try to play God over our behavior, the intent of the Constitution is to define, affirm, and protect our rights (see Preamble).
defines, affirms, and protects them
changes them with each election
Although Congress does try to play God over our behavior, the intent of the Constitution is to define, affirm, and protect our rights (see Preamble).
plays God over our behavior
Although Congress does try to play God over our behavior, the intent of the Constitution is to define, affirm, and protect our rights (see Preamble).
6. Where is the phrase “separation of church and state” found?
the Declaration of Independence
It is surprising how many Christians and conservatives get this one wrong. It must be from too many years of brainwashing by the ACLU. “Separation of church and state” is a phrase used in a letter from Thomas Jefferson to the Danbury Baptist Association on January 1st, 1802. The Baptists were afraid Congress would establish a state denomination. Jefferson wrote to assure them the Constitution forbid the establishment of any denomination as the state church. On the other hand, we know Jefferson never intended to impede public religious activity, or expression because he not only signed bills appropriating financial support for chaplains in Congress and the armed services; he signed the articles of war in 1806 which urged soldiers to attend church services; he offered a National Prayer For Peace in 1805; and he wrote in a letter to Samuel Miller, in 1808, he viewed “the government of the US as interdicted by the Constitution from intermeddling with religious institutions, their doctrines, discipline, or exercises.” (America’s God and Country, Federer, William J. 1994, FAME Publishing, pgs 324-28).
the Articles of Confederation
It is surprising how many Christians and conservatives get this one wrong. It must be from too many years of brainwashing by the ACLU. “Separation of church and state” is a phrase used in a letter from Thomas Jefferson to the Danbury Baptist Association on January 1st, 1802. The Baptists were afraid Congress would establish a state denomination. Jefferson wrote to assure them the Constitution forbid the establishment of any denomination as the state church. On the other hand, we know Jefferson never intended to impede public religious activity, or expression because he not only signed bills appropriating financial support for chaplains in Congress and the armed services; he signed the articles of war in 1806 which urged soldiers to attend church services; he offered a National Prayer For Peace in 1805; and he wrote in a letter to Samuel Miller, in 1808, he viewed “the government of the US as interdicted by the Constitution from intermeddling with religious institutions, their doctrines, discipline, or exercises.” (America’s God and Country, Federer, William J. 1994, FAME Publishing, pgs 324-28).
a personal letter
the Constitution
It is surprising how many Christians and conservatives get this one wrong. It must be from too many years of brainwashing by the ACLU. “Separation of church and state” is a phrase used in a letter from Thomas Jefferson to the Danbury Baptist Association on January 1st, 1802. The Baptists were afraid Congress would establish a state denomination. Jefferson wrote to assure them the Constitution forbid the establishment of any denomination as the state church. On the other hand, we know Jefferson never intended to impede public religious activity, or expression because he not only signed bills appropriating financial support for chaplains in Congress and the armed services; he signed the articles of war in 1806 which urged soldiers to attend church services; he offered a National Prayer For Peace in 1805; and he wrote in a letter to Samuel Miller, in 1808, he viewed “the government of the US as interdicted by the Constitution from intermeddling with religious institutions, their doctrines, discipline, or exercises.” (America’s God and Country, Federer, William J. 1994, FAME Publishing, pgs 324-28).
7. According to the Constitution, and except for Washington D.C., how much land can the federal government own, or control?
wilderness and forestland
The Constitution allows the federal government to own or control only that section of land know as Washington D.C. and land “for the Erection of Forts, Magazines, Arsenals, dock-yards, and other needful Buildings.” (Art 1 §8 (17))
national parks and monuments
The Constitution allows the federal government to own or control only that section of land know as Washington D.C. and land “for the Erection of Forts, Magazines, Arsenals, dock-yards, and other needful Buildings.” (Art 1 §8 (17))
forts, magazines, arsenals, dock yards, and other needful buildings
range and wildlife habitat
The Constitution allows the federal government to own or control only that section of land know as Washington D.C. and land “for the Erection of Forts, Magazines, Arsenals, dock-yards, and other needful Buildings.” (Art 1 §8 (17))
All of the above
The Constitution allows the federal government to own or control only that section of land know as Washington D.C. and land “for the Erection of Forts, Magazines, Arsenals, dock-yards, and other needful Buildings.” (Art 1 §8 (17))
8. Which amendment and date authorized the Federal Reserve System?
Amendment 16 in 1913
There is no such amendment authorizing the Federal Reserve System.
Amendment 20 in 1953
There is no such amendment authorizing the Federal Reserve System.
Amendment 16 in 1923
There is no such amendment authorizing the Federal Reserve System.
there is no such amendment
9. How many states were represented at the Constitutional Convention?
13
There were 13 original States; however, Rhode Island did not have any representatives at the Constitutional Convention. They were jealous of their rights and believed the larger States would overpower or swallow up the smaller States in the creation of a new union. They were the last State to ratify the Constitution; the last to get on board, only after they realized the nation was going ahead without them.
12
None, they were colonies.
There were 13 original States; however, Rhode Island did not have any representatives at the Constitutional Convention. They were jealous of their rights and believed the larger States would overpower or swallow up the smaller States in the creation of a new union. They were the last State to ratify the Constitution; the last to get on board, only after they realized the nation was going ahead without them.
50
There were 13 original States; however, Rhode Island did not have any representatives at the Constitutional Convention. They were jealous of their rights and believed the larger States would overpower or swallow up the smaller States in the creation of a new union. They were the last State to ratify the Constitution; the last to get on board, only after they realized the nation was going ahead without them.
10
There were 13 original States; however, Rhode Island did not have any representatives at the Constitutional Convention. They were jealous of their rights and believed the larger States would overpower or swallow up the smaller States in the creation of a new union. They were the last State to ratify the Constitution; the last to get on board, only after they realized the nation was going ahead without them.
10. Which Article and Section of the Constitution enumerates the specific powers of Congress? How many are listed?
Article 1, §8; 18 powers
Article 12, §2; anything except those protected in the Bill of Rights
The powers are enumerated in Article 1, §8. There are 18 of them.
Article 4. §4; 58 powers
The powers are enumerated in Article 1, §8. There are 18 of them.
Article 3, §1; anything except those protected in the Bill of Rights
The powers are enumerated in Article 1, §8. There are 18 of them.
None of the Above
The powers are enumerated in Article 1, §8. There are 18 of them.